Middle school students explore the science of robotics

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Middle school students explore the science of robotics

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The Robotic Space Challenge camp introduced middle school students to the science of robots Wednesday at NKU.

At the camp, students received the opportunity to learn the in-and-outs of building robots with Legos.  The students used skills such as problem solving, communication, and teamwork to create these robots.

According to Teresa Riley, camp instructor, this is something the kids will be learning throughout the week.

“If they had any doubts such as ‘this is too intelligent for me’ hopefully they can do it,” said Riley.

Andrew, a student at the camp, showed just how skilled he was.  He enjoys coming to the camp because he likes being creative while building his robots, along with coding the robots and seeing the results.

“Coding can be hard, but it pays off in the long run,” Andrew stated.

The middle school students were able to retain a large amount of information in such a short amount of time while still being able to understand the more complex concepts of robotics.

“I think the kids are really ripe for this kind of learning, just like at a certain age you’re ripe for language learning,” explained Riley. “I feel that this is one of the times that the kids are very ripe for learning the engineering properties that are involved.”

According to Riley, these concepts are essential to the growing and developing within the world of technology.

“The world is becoming more and more technological.  There is this internet of things, where everything is connected to everything else,” says Riley.

Riley hopes that in the future we can advance our technology; however, she worries that we need to get more kids interested.

“If you go back and look, technology has grown at an increasing rate and I think it will continue,” said Riley. “A lot of schools have first Lego league where they have competitions.  It would be really great if we could become a feeder for that because then the kids who have not been exposed to it can now be exposed to it.  They would be more interested in doing the Lego league as well.”

Isabela Gibson
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