Middle school students develop businesses in workshop

NKU+student%2C+Jane+Kreutzer%2C+assists+Think+Tank+participant%2C+Karis+Pitchford%2C+in+creating+a+blog+for+her+business.+
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Middle school students develop businesses in workshop

NKU student, Jane Kreutzer, assists Think Tank participant, Karis Pitchford, in creating a blog for her business.

NKU student, Jane Kreutzer, assists Think Tank participant, Karis Pitchford, in creating a blog for her business.

Olivia Krauth

NKU student, Jane Kreutzer, assists Think Tank participant, Karis Pitchford, in creating a blog for her business.

Olivia Krauth

Olivia Krauth

NKU student, Jane Kreutzer, assists Think Tank participant, Karis Pitchford, in creating a blog for her business.

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Middle school students from around the area converged on Northern Kentucky University’s campus to attend Norse Think Tank, a program designed to meet the needs of gifted and talented students in grades sixth through eighth on Wednesday.

This unique program, in its initial summer, focuses on the creation and development of entrepreneurial plans through hands-on activities that help improve crucial problem-solving skills. Throughout the program, students will research business ideas, eventually deciding on a business that they would like to focus on and develop a plan for.

“Our goal is to just get the kids thinking about things they may want to do,” Karen Lageman, one of the instructors at Norse Think Tank said.

In addition, the students will generate a blog that explains the business and that follows their progress.

“It’s all of their own work,” Lageman said. “They can design the background themselves and design everything about the template. It’s really neat.”

Elizabeth Apollonio, a seventh grader, labels the blog as her favorite part of the camp.

“I just like playing around on the blog and them showing us how to use the blog,” Apollonio said.

The business plans range from friendship bracelets to a company that would make anything a customer requested.

“Everyone is so different from each other,” Lageman said. “Every kid has their own mindset.”

 

 

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